…in the lives of our children.

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“It’s estimated a 10% increase of peak bone mass in children reduces the risk of an osteoporotic fracture during adult life by 50%.”

“The prevention of osteoporosis begins with optimal bone growth and development in youth. It is recommended children engage in physical activity for at least 40 minutes a day. This exercise can include sports with a weight-bearing element (cycling and swimming are non-weight-bearing) or activities such as dancing, skipping, running or walking.

Weight-bearing exercises build bone density and mass, making them stronger and less vulnerable to osteoporosis later in life. Building bone density and mass is particularly important for young people aged 8 to16.

Research has shown physically active young girls gain about 40% more bone mass than the least active girls of the same age. In girls, the bone tissue accumulated during the ages of 11 to 13 approximately equals the amount lost during the 30 years following menopause.”

This excellent information is quoted from the International Osteoporosis Foundation, whose link is:

http://www.iofbonehealth.org/

What About Today’s Seniors?

Because of the changes that aging brings, the benefits of weight bearing exercise still exist, but at a significantly reduced effect. These effects, though diminished, are still very important. In clinical trials, compared to sedentary Seniors who are continuing to lose bone density at a rate of about two to three percent per year, subjects who participated in a program of regular weight bearing exercise experienced an average of one percent gain per year. Obviously, over a period of just a few years, these numbers become very significant; especially if one is borderline osteoporotic to begin with. It’s important, as well, that we not forget the additional benefits of an organized exercise program that includes bone-building movements. Increased muscle mass and strength, especially in the elderly, means a better chance of survival. Also contributing to a safer and more enjoyable lifestyle is the increase in coordination and balance that result from movement and exercise.

Back To Our Children

If the only benefit from organized, effective exercise programs was the 50% reduction in future Osteoporosis, it would make overwhelming sense to make sure our children had access to such programs; for them as individuals, and for us as a society.

When we add in all the other numerous positive side effects of exercise, it becomes beyond overwhelming.

To Our Health and Wellness,

Steven

The Senior Health and Fitness Blog by Steven Siemons is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.
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